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1. Justify the title of the poem ‘Daybreak’.

Answer: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem ‘Daybreak’ masterfully conveys the beauty and significance of a new day’s beginning. As the night surrenders to the morning, the sea – wind eagerly informs the news of ‘daybreak’ to all livings. This symbolic moment symbolizes hope, renewal, and the potential for a fresh start. The wind rouses the slumbering ships, mariners, birds, and even the church bell, inviting them to embrace the opportunity for growth, transformation, and the pursuit of dreams. Longfellow’s poetic masterpiece encapsulates the essence of this anticipation, as he describes the world being infused with light and beauty, filling the hearts of individuals with joy and optimism. Daybreak, in its true essence, serves as a powerful symbol of our daily journey, where we embrace the limitless possibilities that each new day brings. So, the title of the poem is appropriate.

2. Narrate the wind’s activities as presented in the poem ‘Daybreak’.

Or

Give the substance of the poem ‘Daybreak’.

Answer: In the poem ‘Daybreak’, Longfellow personifies the sea-wind that awakens the natural phenomena at the very beginning of the day. Emerging from the sea, the wind commands the mists to make way for its presence. It then greets the ships and encourages the mariners to set sail. With a sense of urgency, it travels towards the land, rousing everyone from their slumber. The wind implores the forests to proudly display their leafy banners, while gently nudging the wood-bird to awaken and sing. As it passes over the farm, it requests the chanticleer to sound its clarion call. In the cornfield, it whispers to the stalks to bow down and welcome the morning. Upon reaching the belfry tower, the wind prompts the bells to announce the hour. However, it heaves a melancholic sigh when it arrives at the churchyard. It refrains from disturbing the deceased in their graves, recognizing that it is not yet their time to rise.

3. Who takes the responsibility of announcing the breaking of the day? How is the feat achieved?

Answer: The wind takes the responsibility of announcing the breaking of the day in the poem ‘Daybreak’ by H.W. Longfellow.

Emerging from the sea, the wind commands the mists to make way for its presence. It then greets the ships and encourages the mariners to set sail. With a sense of urgency, it travels towards the land, rousing everyone from their slumber. The wind implores the forests to proudly display their leafy banners, while gently nudging the wood-bird to awaken and sing. As it passes over the farm, it requests the chanticleer to sound its clarion call. In the cornfield, it whispers to the stalks to bow down and welcome the morning. Upon reaching the belfry tower, the wind prompts the bells to announce the hour. However, it heaves a melancholic sigh when it arrives at the churchyard. It refrains from disturbing the deceased in their graves, recognizing that it is not yet their time to rise.

4. What role does the wind play in announcing the beginning of the day? How is the final couplet different from the rest of the poem?

Answer:  The wind plays the role of an alarm clock in announcing the beginning of the day in the poem ‘Daybreak’. The wind awakens all the elements of nature, such as the ships, mariners, forest, wood-bird, chanticleer, corn-field, and belfry-tower, as if it were an alarm clock. Towards the end of the poem, the wind takes on the role of a pious Christian, offering advice to the deceased to find peace in their graves, as it is not yet their time to rise.

The final couplet of the poem presents a contrast to the preceding verses, as the wind is unable to rouse the dead from their resting places. Instead, it advises them to remain at peace in their graves, recognizing that it is not yet their time to awaken.


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