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Assertive Sentence Narration Change Worksheet (Direct Speech to Indirect Speech) The Greenhouse Effect – Carl Dennis | Class 12 Sonnet no. 73 That time of year thou mayst in me behold | Class 12 Hawk Roosting – Ted Hughes | Class 12 Down The Rabbit-Hole – Lewis Carrol | Class 12 Tara- Mahesh Dattani | Class 12 Our Casuarina Tree – Toru Dutt | Class 12 From A Room of One’s Own [SHAKESPEARE’S SISTER] – Virginia Woolf | Class 12 The Night Train at Deoli – Ruskin Bond (বঙ্গানুবাদ) | Class 12 Amarnath-Sister Nivedita MCQs and Answers | Class 11
This humorous poem suggests some dangerous ways to identify (or ‘tell’) wild animals! Read it aloud, keeping to a strong and regular rhythm.
If ever you should go by chance 
To jungles in the east;
And if there should to you advance
A large and tawny beast,
If he roars at you as you’re dyin’
You’ll know it is the Asian Lion…

Or if some time when roaming round,
A noble wild beast greets you,
With black stripes on a yellow ground,
Just notice if he eats you.
This simple rule may help you learn
The Bengal Tiger to discern.

If strolling forth, a beast you view,
Whose hide with spots is peppered,
As soon as he has lept on you,
You’ll know it is the Leopard.
’Twill do no good to roar with pain,
He’ll only lep and lep again.

If when you’re walking round your yard
You meet a creature there,
Who hugs you very, very hard,
Be sure it is a Bear.
If you have any doubts, I guess
He’ll give you just one more caress.

Though to distinguish beasts of prey
A novice might nonplus,
The Crocodile you always may
Tell from the Hyena thus:
Hyenas come with merry smiles;
But if they weep they’re Crocodiles.

The true Chameleon is small,
A lizard sort of thing;
He hasn’t any ears at all,
And not a single wing.
If there is nothing on the tree,
’Tis the chameleon you see.

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